Sometimes my work is like a succession of notes; first there was an image, from there another image came, from there another one. A succession of things I should not forget. Not now nor later. These 'notes' I put together in books. Often not on paper. Often in edition of 1. (Click on the different titles for a close-up).

dated 2001 until 2013 (click on an image to enlarge an artwork)
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... TRACES, the end of the road ...

2009

Land changes. Landscape changes. Through fault of time, of rain, wind and humans. Everything leaves its traces. Every presence, every intervention. Vague or explicit. Prints in the land. Traces as signs of passing time. In commission of Natuurkunst Drenthe I built an installation at Schoonoord; by means of frottages on textile I registered traces, that will pass away further through time (see under 'Installations' for more information). After finishing this project I felt the urge to document it. From there, this work appeared: a book made of brown velvet, 14 textile pages. I combined photographs of the stones and the wood that I captured in frottages with parts of the frottages itself. This lead up to 12 collages, tied together in this book.

Old Roads

2013

Old Roads They were constructed during the crisis of the first part of the 20th century. Like this road of flints in the area of Drenthe. I see the men at work. On their knees of bent over, I see all those hands putting those stones in place. One by one. Thousands of stones. This "Sad poem" of Toon Tellegen comes into my mind: 'This is the end of the road', they said. There was a sign: THIS IS THE END OF THE ROAD. 'Here, this point', they said. They squat and carefully touched it. 'Is this it?' 'This is it.' It was automn, it rained, it stormed. They rose, turned away. Later they came back with a magnifying-glass. It really was the end of the road. (©Toon Tellegen) The pages of this book are made of the inprints (frottages) of some of those thousands of stones on the road of flints. ©Ine van Son 2007 - 2013  

Coming Home, four abandonend houses in Clare, Ireland

2001

My first book came into being in 2001, during my first period in Ireland. I became intrigued by the poetic images in abandoned houses. In the book 'Coming Home, four abandoned houses in Clare, Ireland' I put together some of these images with texts from the Irisch oral tradition in songs and stories. The book is printed in an edition of 200 copies. It is the only one of my books of what the coming into being I put out (to a printer).

Coming Home, archive 1

2003

In continuation to my first book "Coming Home, four abandoned houses in Clare, Ireland', I started experimenting with the phenomenon 'book'. I wanted to have complete control of the making, unlike the production of my first book. And I wanted the images to be less clean, less distant. I was, and I am still, not finished working with the poetic force of the images in abandoned houses that I photographed. I started to feel the need to physically show the kind of material that I came across in these houses, next to the photographs. I used parts of hardboard with bits of wallpaper as 'pages'. Once this material was used as a layer in front of a wall. The result of this experiment carries the title: 'Coming Home, archive 1', and has 5 'pages' of hardboard with a photograph. The pages are tied together with cord. To be continued...

Coming Home, archive 2

2004

In continuation to my first book "Coming Home, four abandoned houses in Clare, Ireland', I started experimenting with the phenomenon 'book'. I wanted to have complete control of the making, unlike the production of my first book. And I wanted the images to be less clean, less distant. I was, and I am still, not finished working with the poetic force of the images in abandoned houses that I photographed. I started to feel the need to physically show the kind of material that I came across in these houses, next to the photographs. In this book I uses pieces of cardboard as 'pages'. Once this material was used to pack up and transport rooftiles. In collaboration with the photographs every page is a collage. The result of this experiment carries the title: 'Coming Home, archive 2', and has 8 'pages' of cardboard. The photographs were taken in the very first house I visited. Where it all started. I was extremely touched by the colours I found there: bleu and green floors, pink and red and yellow and blue walls. An extremely powerfull poetic beauty. The house was situated on a small hill, well visible. Beside a small but busy road; to stop and park the car was an adventure. The cows were grazing in the garden. From the house there was a magnificent view on the surrounding hills and the sea. A spot which made me dream. How have people been able to ever leave here. But well, you can't live on a view alone...

What happens to the wool of Jaaps' sheep

2011

My neighbour Jaaps keeps sheep. From him I obtain every year the wool that I use in my work. Jaap gives me a sign when the sheepshearer comes, so I can follow the whole process. The communication between sheep and shearer is intriguing; he pushes her into a position so she can hardly move, than he reassures her with some soothing words, he carresses her a bit. When she relaxes the shearing strarts. When the shearing is done I pick the wool in cotton bags, then for me the work really starts. I wash and rinse the wool with soft soap in big tubs. I dry the washed wool in baskets, so the wind can blow across. When the wool is well-dryed, the process of working it starts; carding in the cardweel, spinning on the spinning wheel. Then the wool is ready for further use. This proces that, from the beginning, the moment the wool comes from the sheep until the end, is completely in my own hands, gives me a special relationship with the material. And also with the 'suppliers', Jaaps' sheep. I used to get a lot of questions about this process. This made me create this book; I took photographs at essential points in the process, the photographs I incorporated in a book which is made in crochet, made of the wool of Jaaps' sheep. Here under a photograph of the title-page:

Book 1

2008

Page 1 from 'Book 1, about stones, wood, water and wire through time', in edition of 1. Page 4 from 'Book 1'.

Book 2

2008

Page 3 from Book 2, 'Es ist wirklich nur ein Kampf ums Wort'. In edition of 1. Page 13-14 from Book 2.

About the passing of time

2009

The book '...ABOUT THE PASSING OF TIME..., report of things that fade away'. Frottage is the most direct way to register: you make an impression of differences in hight. Structures that are no longer visible with the naked eye appear from obscurity with the help of frottage. It also is an instantaneous exposure; in some time a frottage made at the same spot will look different. That way you catch the passing of time. Page 1.

Traces of passing time

2011

The booklet 'Traces of passing time' I created for MailArtBooks (www.projectmailartbooks.com). The booklet contains on the left pages the following text: Land changes. Landscape changes. Under influence of time. Of weather condition. Of human interference. Every presence leaves its traces. In stones, in wood. And these traces too will, by the passing of time, become vague and disappear. On the right pages a part of frottage in cray. On het last pages (13 and 14), left as well as right, a piece of frottage. This photograph shows these last two pages. And here under a photograph of pages 1-2: